Plasma 5.6 beta available on Fedora

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Plasma 5.6 will be out in two weeks but the Plasma team has just released Plasma 5.6 beta which already features all the new yummy things and improvements as well as bunch of bug fixes that will be available in the 5.6 release.

Among other things Plasma 5.6 brings improved color scheme support, task manager on steroids, some new applets as well as further progress on the Wayland front. Two completely new things come as a tech preview: GRUB2 and Plymouth themes to make your system look fancy from the first second you power it up (see instructions below how to enable them).

You can ready the release announcement with more detailed descriptions and screenshots here.

The Fedora KDE SIG team has updated the Plasma 5 Unstable Copr repository so you can get a taste of Plasma 5.6 on Fedora 23 now (sorry for the lack of F22 builds). Rawhide will probably get the beta update some time next week.

$ dnf copr enable @kdesig/plasma-5-unstable
$ dnf update

Due to some changes in upstream releases of KActivities it is possible that you will get package conflict between kactivitymanagerd-debuginfo and kf5-kactivities-debuginfo. In that case please uninstall the kf5-kactivities-debuginfo package. This will be fixed properly once we roll out KDE Frameworks 5.20.

 

If you want to try the new GRUB and Plymouth themes, install the new packages

$ dnf install grub2-breeze-theme plymouth-theme-breeze

To enable the GRUB theme, edit /etc/default/grub:

GRUB_TERMINAL_OUTPUT="gfxterm"
GRUB_THEME=/boot/grub2/themes/breeze/theme.txt

and generate new GRUB configuration:

$ grub2-mkconfig -o /boot/grub2/grub.cfg

To enable the Plymouth theme, run

plymouth-set-default-theme breeze --rebuild-initrd

 

If you run into any packaging issues, please talk to us on #fedora-kde on IRC or kde@lists.fedoraproject.org. If you find any bugs or crashes, please report them to bugs.kde.org so that Plasma developers can fix them before the final 5.6 release.

Plasma 5.3 for Fedora

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Fedora logoPlasma 5.3, new feature release of KDE workspace, has been released on Tuesday and you can get it now on Fedora.

Plasma 5.3 brings new features, improvements and almost 400 bug fixes for basically all of its components ranging from power management to various applets.

For users of Fedora 20 and Fedora 21 the traditional COPR repository has been updated. If you already use it just do yum update. If you want to switch to Plasma 5 from KDE 4 just follow the instructions on the main page.

Fedora 22, which is currently in beta, already has the 5.3 update in updates-testing and we are continuously polishing the update. For all KDE users updating to Fedora 22, when it’s released in May, it will also mean final bye bye to KDE 4 and switch to Plasma 5. Fedora 22 repositories also features the latest release of KDE Telepathy, which finally brings IM integration into Plasma 5.

If you want to try out Plasma 5.3 on Fedora but don’t want to install it on your computer yet there’s, as always, a live ISO available for you based on Fedora 22 beta. And this time I did include a working installer (for real!), so when you change your mind just click “Install” ;-)

We welcome any feedback and testing from users, feel free to report any bugs to bugzilla.redhat.com, talk to us on #fedora-kde IRC channel on Freenode or join our mailing list.

Plasma 5.2 arrives to Fedora

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It’s here! Plasma 5.2 has been released just yesterday and you don’t have to wait a single minute longer to update your beloved Fedora boxes :-)

I won’t go into detail here about all the new awesome things that are waiting for you in Plasma 5.2, but I totally recommend that you go and read Plasma 5.2: The Quintessential Breakdown by Ken Vermette while you are waiting for your package manager to wade through the update. You can also read the official Plasma 5.2 release announcement, it has fancy animated screenshots ;).

And there’s other news related to Plasma 5.2 and Fedora: Fedora rawhide has bee updated to Plasma 5.2 too. This means that KDE SIG will ship Plasma 5 in Fedora 22! Of course we will still maintain the Copr repository for our Fedora 20 and Fedora 21 users.

So, how to get Plasma 5.2 on Fedora?

On rawhide, just do dnf update. On Fedora 20 and Fedora 21, if you are already running Plasma 5.1.2 from dvratil/plasma-5 Copr, then all you need to do is to run dnf update. If you are running Plasma 5.1.95 (aka Plasma 5.2 beta) from dvratil/plasma-5-beta Copr, then it’s time to switch back to stable:

dnf copr disable dvratil/plasma-5-beta
dnf copr enable dvratil/plasma-5
dnf update

If you are still running KDE 4 and you want to update to Plasma 5.2, just follow the instructions on dvratil/plasma-5 Copr page.

And if you don’t feel like installing Plasma 5 on your production box right away and would like to just try it out, there’s a live ISO for you. This time I did not forget to add Anaconda, so once you decide that Plasma 5 is good enough for you, you can just install it right from the ISO ;-)

EDIT: I might have included Anaconda, but did not add grub2 to the ISO, so the installer would fail anyway. This has been fixed and updated images are available now on the same link. If you are planning to install from the live ISO, please download the updated images (29-Jan-2015 00:42)

 

Oh, and if anyone is around in Brno next week for DevConf, let us know and we can informally meet for ceremonious consumption of beer to celebrate the Plasma release ;)

Plasma 5.2 Beta available for Fedora testers

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On Tuesday KDE has released first beta of the upcoming Plasma 5.2. Plasma 5.2 is adding many new features and improvements and we would welcome testers to help find and fix bugs before the final release.

Fedora 21 with Plasma 5.2 beta Fedora users are welcome to try out Plasma 5.2 beta, either by running Fedora Plasma 5.2 beta live ISO, or by installing packages from plasma-5-beta Copr (see Installation Instructions on the Copr page)

Check out the release announcement to see what new features and improvements are waiting for you in Plasma 5.2. Final release will be in two weeks on January 27, after that we will update the plasma-5 Copr to get the update to all our users :-)

KDE Frameworks 5.3 and KDE Plasma 5.1 for Fedora are ready!

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Fedora KDE SIG is happy to announce that latest version of KDE Frameworks 5 have just reached stable repositories of Fedora and  brand new version of KDE Plasma 5 is now available in the our Plasma 5 COPR.

KDE Frameworks 5.3.0

The third release of KDE Frameworks brings mostly bugfixes. KDE Frameworks 5 is a collection of libraries and software frameworks created by the KDE community. It’s an effort to rework KDE 4 libraries into a set of individual and independent, cross platform modules that will be readily available to all Qt-based applications.

KDE Frameworks 5 are available in official Fedora repositories for Fedora 20 and the upcoming Fedora 21.

KDE Plasma 5.1

Fedora 20 running KDE Plasma 5KDE Plasma 5 is the next generation of KDE workspace based on Qt 5 and KDE Frameworks. It’s latest version brings many bug fixes, performance improvements but also many new features! Dark color theme for the Breeze style, more widgets, improved Task switcher, reworked tray icons and much more. You can read about all the new things in Plasma 5.1 in the official release announcement.

To install KDE Plasma 5 on Fedora, just add the Plasma 5 COPR repository to yum, and simply run yum install plasma-5.

Live ISO

Do you want to give Plasma 5 a try, but don’t want to install it yet? Easy! We have prepared a live ISO image based on Fedora 20 for you! You can get it from here: http://pub.dvratil.cz/plasma/iso/5.1/ (use Torrent for faster download).

Do you need help? Come talk to us: either on #fedora-kde IRC channel on Freenode, or join our mailing list kde@lists.fedoraproject.org.

Fedora 20 running KDE Plasma 5

Hacking my way through Randa

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Hello! This is me, reporting from Randa KDE meetings!

I decided to go to Randa to work with the KDE Mutlimedia team on getting Date in the Digital Clock appletPhonon GStreamer 1.0 port out and to discuss future directions of Phonon. As you could figure out from Harald’s blog, my mission was successful (mostly). All the original porting work was done by Rohan Garg, Torrie Fisher and Harald Sitter, so big thanks to them! Here in Randa I was mostly fixing existing Phonon GStreamer bugs and polishing the 1.0 port to make it ready for release (had to undust my glib skills :P). An just three days ago, we pushed out first public beta. That night we also fixed a bug that made videos in Gwenview have a blue tint, but the fix is not in the beta release.

Even though it was not part of the plans for Randa, I spend all Wednesday trying to fix some issues in Plasma 5 that were too annoying for me to just continue ignoring them – so in Plasma 5.0.2 the labels in Kickoff will finally be properly centered and in Plasma 5.1 the date will return to the Digital Clock applet. I also submitted patches to add keyboard layout changer and CapsLock-on warning to the new screen locker.

Screenlocker with keyboard layout switcher and caps lock warningI tried to avoid working on KDE PIM here, but got bribed by chocolate into fixing a specific bug related to contacts and events tags, which I started working on, but haven’t finished yet.

And now it’s time to leave. If it was up to me, I could just stay in this beautiful place all year… :-)

Many thanks to Mario and the team for organizing the Randa meetings, many thanks to sponsors who made this possible financially and finally huge round of applause to the kitchen team for preparing such delicious meals :-)

See you all in Brno in couple weeks!

I’m going to Akademy!

KDE Frameworks 5 Beta and Plasma Next preview on Fedora!

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The Fedora KDE SIG brings you all the new and cool stuff from KDE Frameworks and Plasma Next worlds!

First, our Copr repository with KDE Frameworks has been updated to 4.99.0 release, so go get it! All frameworks are co-installable with KDE 4, so you can develop against KF5 without needing any special setup. Also KDE Frameworks 5 were approved as feature for Fedora 21, which means that in next Fedora release, we will ship all Frameworks in the Fedora repositories! There are already some packages imported into rawhide, the rest will follow in next weeks.

And now for the awesome news: we have a live ISO with Plasma Next preview!

Fedora Plasma Next Live ISO Login screen

We packaged as much as we could (but still not everything!), including Rekonq, Dolphin, System Settings, Baloo, Milou and more – all built against Qt 5 and KDE Frameworks 5 of course.

 

Get Fedora Plasma Next Live ISO!

(..or get it via torrent)

 

If you are really interested in trying locally, you can check out all the additional packages from kde-frameworks-unstable and plasma-next COPRs, but remember that all packages from those repositories install to /usr, so you will get conflicts with KDE 4 packages.

Display Management in KDE

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As some of you might have noticed, display management in KDE is not really something we could be proud of. It does not work as expected, it lacks some features and it’s not really maintained. Time to change it, don’t you think? :-)

The effort was initiated by Alex Fiestas (who is too busy to making KDE rock, so the blog post is up to me :-)). Alex has written the libkscreen library that provides information about available/connected/enabled outputs and notifications about their changes. He also intends to write a KDED daemon that would listen for these events and depending on connected monitors (every monitor can be uniquely identified by it’s EDID) it would load specific configuration. For example, docking your notebook into a docking station at work would automatically turn on a second monitor and place it left of the notebook screen (or whatever you configure the first time you do it). Undocking the notebook and connecting a data projector in a meeting room would automatically set clone mode etc. etc.

This also requires a new UI in System Settings which is the part I’m working on.

It’s written in QML and allows you to configure your displays by dragging them around rather then configuring them through combo boxes. Picture is worth a thousand words, and when it’s a moving picture, well…..


Download OGV (1.8 MB) (in real time the animations are faster and smoother of course)

The best part of all this is that users won’t be exposed to the KCM very often, because connecting an already-known monitor will configure it and place it automatically depending on the last configuration. Connecting a previously unknown output should pop up a simple window/dialog where user can quickly select whether the display should be left/right/clone of the active screen or open the KCM and perform more advanced configuration.

(Note: this is just a preview, we will have the icons made by someone sane)

Right now I’m abusing the krandrtray icon for the applet. It does not provide any rich features like krandrtray though, it only has a context menu with a single action to start the KCM. This should be enough because unlike current krandr-based display configuration there most things will work automagically.

And of course we will take care of displaying these dialogs and windows on the correct screen (that is the one that is connected and enabled) :-)

Finally, we want to use KWin scripting engine to display a black overlay over the entire desktop when changing display configuration in order to hide Plasma flickering and resizing from users and make it look like a smooth transition.

Hopefully I didn’t miss anything :)

LibVirt Monitor Plasma Applet

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This semester I attended Advanced Topics of Linux Administration course on my university. To successfully complete the course, one must pass an exam, have a presentation and write an article on a related topic. I had a presentation about libvirt and decided to write an introduction into using libvirt’s API (the article has been published (in English) on Czech Linux portal ABCLinuxu.cz).

As an example, I have written a Plasma Applet in QML (yay, my first QML thingie!) and a Plasma DataEngine that serves data about QEMU/KVM virtual machines running under local libvirtd.

On the applet you can watch state of all virtual machines, you can boot/pause/resume/shutdown and reboot them and configure soft and hard memory limits and amount of virtual CPUs allocated to each machine.

Pictures!

I must admit that I was always a bit skeptical about QML, but my two previous encounters with QML made me really curious about it and writing this applet was really painfun and it taught me a lot about QML.

The big advantage of the DataEngine is that it’s not constantly polling libvirt for changes, but it rather utilizes it’s events API.

Wanna try? :-) There’s a tarball here and git repo here: git://anongit.kde.org/scratch/dvratil/plasma-virt-monitor

It was fun to hack and I plan to give it some more love, possibly after Akademy.

PS: Akademy – anyone flying on Friday at 08:10 from Vienna :-) ?